Ummahtic Inspiration

Ummahtic Inspiration

We are ready with several interventions to encourage scientific interest, creativity and confident career building, especially amongst the young. These include; Mentoring Seminar, Young Muslim Researchers Colloquia, Science Day, Soulful Careers Fair and Entrepreneurship training.

IMASE Research Publication - The current situation of professional Muslim women in Tanzania

This paper attempts to explain the current situation of professional Muslim women in Tanzania. It will focus on the situation faced by Muslim women in pursuing their careers. This paper will also attempt to propose appropriate solutions to these problems. The study is based in Dar es Salaam and it will focus on the professionals in the city. Dar es Salaam is the biggest city in Tanzania and most professionals prefer to work in Dar es Salaam. The duration of this study is six months and it focuses on the discrimination of professional Muslim women. The target groups are young professional Muslim women and non Muslim women who developed their careers in the years 1999 to 2003. The techniques that used for this study were; interviews, documentary analysis and observations. The interview guide comprised of open-ended questions whilst the data analysis was carried out through content analysis method. The findings will be presented to the International Muslim Association of Scientists and Engineers (IMASE).

by Ms. Idda Romore

 

This paper attempts to explain the current situation of professional Muslim women in Tanzania. It will focus on the situation faced by Muslim women in pursuing their careers. This paper will also attempt to propose appropriate solutions to these problems. The study is based in Dar es Salaam and it will focus on the professionals in the city. Dar es Salaam is the biggest city in Tanzania and most professionals prefer to work in Dar es Salaam. The duration of this study is six months and it focuses on the discrimination of professional Muslim women. The target groups are young professional Muslim women and non Muslim women who developed their careers in the years 1999 to 2003. The techniques that used for this study were; interviews, documentary analysis and observations. The interview guide comprised of open-ended questions whilst the data analysis was carried out through content analysis method. The findings will be presented to the International Muslim Association of Scientists and Engineers (IMASE).

Click here for the full report

 

Mentoring Seminar, 3rd November 2001

Imperial College, London, UK

The seminar was organised by IMASE in conjunction with London Achievers and the Islamic Society of Imperial College.

Summary

The objectives of this course were to:

  • Provide prospective mentors with an insight into mentoring and what it involves.
  • Outline the benefits to be gained from mentoring for both the mentor and the mentee.
  • Introduce ways in which mentor-mentee relationships can be developed and sustained most effectively.
 
Br. Kausar Ahmed from London Achievers gave the first presentation, followed by Sr. Unaiza Karim from Birmingham. Both Br. Kausar and Sr. Unaiza are professional teachers, and are actively involved in mentoring programs. The third talk was given by Br. Waseef Asghar, who is a professional councillor from Reading. Br. Muhammad Rashid formally concluded the seminar by informing the participants on how to get involved in the mentoring project.

Kausar Ahmed (London Achievers): "What is mentoring all about and why"

Br. Kausar outlined the role of a mentor as being a person that achieves a one-to-one developmental relationship with a learner, and one whom the learner identifies as having enabled personal growth to take place. He mentioned that a mentor is a friend, a role model, a sounding board, a guide, a motivator, an adviser, and a facilitator to the mentee. He also pointed out that the mentor is not meant to be a teacher or a social worker.

Br. Kausar referred to a good mentor as a person who has knowledge of the mentee, has the skills to develop a personal rapport with them and has personal qualities such as commitment and motivation. He then outlined many of the “Dos” and "Don’ts" in a mentoring relationship, and also highlighted the benefits to be gained by mentors as well as mentees. Finally he reminded the participants to have patience, as mentoring is a slow process where the result may take time to materialise but will be a lasting one, insha’Allah. It will be an experience well worth the effort.

Unaiza Karim - "Personal experiences as a mentor"

Sr. Unaiza started by mentioning that children are being set up for failure because they have people like Bruce Willis, Uma Thurman, Britney Spears, and so on, for their role models. As their personalities are manufactured and not ‘real’, it is difficult for children to be able to be like them.

She mentioned that most children of 5 to 6 years of age in the inner cities want to be doctors, engineers, pilots, etc, indicating that they have high goals. However, as they grow up to be teenagers, they become indifferent and unmotivated, often dropping out of mainstream society. Why? It would seem that the majority of these children lack encouragement, and someone to believe in them and their aspirations. This is the primary goal of the mentor - to act as a person who encourages and believes in the ability of the young person.

Sr. Unaiza then gave some practical tips from her experience as a mentor and mentioned that a good mentor is also a good listener. She also highlighted the importance of being a good time manager. One of the main functions of the mentor is to set goals for the mentor and mentee to achieve together. The goals needs to be SMART ones, i.e. Specific, Measurable, Agreed upon/Action oriented, Realistic and Time bound.

Sr. Unaiza concluded by saying that we are all indirectly mentors ourselves, especially to those young ones amongst our friends and family.

Waseef Asghar - "Tips on being a good mentor"

Br. Waseef concentrated on outlining steps to develop and improve one’s listening skills. He reiterated the fact that a good mentor is a good listener. A good listener is one who does not interrupt, is interested and concerned with the mentee’s problems, receptive and is non-judgemental. He also went through some practical exercises with the participants in which he demonstrated that body language is vital for good communication.

Br. Waseef said that a good mentor does not preach, and always works on the problem that the mentee wants to work on, not on those the mentor thinks are important.

At the end of this lecture session, the floor was opened up for questions from the participants.

Br. Muhammad Rashid (London Achievers) - "How to get involved in mentoring"

This was mainly targeted at those living in the London area.

Br. Muhammad mentioned that this seminar was only an introductory course, and that those seriously interested in becoming mentors would be asked to attend a 2-day intensive course. After that, the Mentor would be introduced to the mentee at the London Achievers office in East London. The mentors and mentees are later expected to make arrangements to meet each other at least twice a month. There would also be a monthly meeting between the mentors to share experiences.

Audio Files
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The 1st IMASE Young Muslim Researchers Colloquium

Are you a researcher? A PhD student? A final year undergraduate wanting to pursue research?

Muslim researchers of all disciplinary backgrounds are invited to take part in our first research gathering designed to build bridges solely within our academic community.

During the afternoon there will be the opportunity to present your research (such that it is accessible by the non-specialist), exchange experiences and develop new relationships of learning that could potentially extend to formal research collaborations.

The International Muslim Association of Scientists and Engineers (IMASE) is a network of scholars, researchers, students and professionals who work together to nurture and exploit knowledge, with an Islamic framework, for the benefit of humanity. We believe that research activity should be encouraged, supported and appreciated since learning is a vital part of Islamic culture and heritage. Please refer to our website www.imase.org for further details of our current initiatives and what work our voluntary network has undertaken in the past.

Light Refreshments will be available.
 
More info :
http://www.imase.org/component/option,com_simpleboard/Itemid,37/func,view/id,19/catid,6/

Time:
1pm to 6pm

Date:
Saturday 26th November

Contact:
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
0780 362 7576

Venue:
Room 1.13
First Floor
Franklin Wilkins Building
Stamford Street
Waterloo Campus
King's College London

Nearest Tube:
Waterloo/Temple


Science Communication, 12th October 2004

with Ehsan Masood* and Dr Nicholas Russel**l

6.30 pm - 8.30 pm, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London, SW7 2AZ

A lecture and discussion focusing on inspiring creativity and appropriate usage of one's talent, skills and experience for the benefit of society. In particular, it will be looking at ways of encouraging people to read more widely, think outside the box, try out new approaches, and articulate these through effective writing.

Science journalism is still very much a niche area, especially so amongst Muslims. It presents exciting study and career options and could be extremely rewarding if pursued seriously. The ability to communicate ideas, findings and analysis in writing is a powerful tool, not only for academics and researchers but for policy makers and industry professionals alike. However, it is something that is not acquired overnight, but requires nurturing and refinement through focused and sustained effort.

* Ehsan Masood is a journalist based in London specialising in science and international development. His work often appears in publications such as Nature, New Scientist and Science and Development Network (www.scidev.net) - a news website reporting on science, technology, and the developing world. He has also written for The Guardian, Le Monde and El Pais. Ehsan is a consultant to Leadership for Environment and Development (LEAD), for whom he was previously director of communications. Prior to LEAD, he was the opinion editor at New Scientist and has also worked as a science reporter for Nature, covering environmental sciences, UN environment conventions and international science and technology policy. Ehsan graduated in Physics followed by a Masters in Science Communication from Birkbeck College, London.

** Dr Nicholas Russell is a senior lecturer and director of postgraduate studies in Science Communication and Science Media Production at Imperial College London.